Independence Day: Resurgence Review

Published on: June 23, 2016

Filled Under: Film, What's On

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It’s the end of June which can only mean one thing, it must be the 4th of July. Wait a minute we’re confused….anyway…. They’re back! And so are many of the original cast (except for Will Smith) as Jeff Goldblum and Bill Pullman return for another punch up with aliens 20 years on in Independence Day Resurgence.

In the two decades that have pasted since we last met this ET fighting crew Earth has seen human vs alien ground war and is now using the alien technology harvested from the last invasion to protect itself. This is a good thing too as man are they gonna need it! Aliens in deep space have received a signal, or a 20 year old voice mail if you will, and have sent a larger and more powerful ship that is planning to literally suck the face off our lovely planet.

Resurgence does everything you’d want and expect from a action sequel: massive city destroying explosions, cheesy lines and plot holes you could fly a giant mother ship through….so pretty much exactly what the first Independence Day did.  It was great to see Brent Spiner return as Dr. Brackish Okun and Judd Hirsch doesn’t look a day older as Julius Levinson, Jeff Goldblum’s onscreen dad. Goldblum as always is a great watch and we’re surprised his charisma didn’t win over some alien hearts and end the war sharpish.

However, you can’t help but feel there is a ‘Big Willie’ sized hole in the film, even with Liam Hemsworth and Jessie Usher trying to fill it with an amalgamation of Will Smith’s original character. This is where the film falls down as the new cast members seem to lack the bang for the buck that you get from the returning original cast. That said we had a truly entertaining two hours of Alien butt whooping so If you don’t go in expecting 2001: A Space Odyssey and you’ll have a great time.

It’s big, it’s loud and it’s a whole lot of fun, Independence Day Resurgence is a good old popcorn flick that does what it says on its extra terrestrial tin.

Reviewed by Ian Wright and Ingrid Grenar.

3.5 stars small

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